Back Issue

28.1

On the cover: Multi-disciplined surfboard artisan Joe Roper. Features inside the book include a Mexican wave zone lost to time and interest, a glacial-fed A-frame, and a surf playground amid an atomic testing range. The animation and comic paneling of cartoonists Stephen Hillenburg and Roy Gonzalez, plus the creative outputs of Josh Martin, Denis Stock, and Nate Lawrence add additional facets and textures.

Back Issue

28.1

On the cover: Multi-disciplined surfboard artisan Joe Roper. Features inside the book include a Mexican wave zone lost to time and interest, a glacial-fed A-frame, and a surf playground amid an atomic testing range. The animation and comic paneling of cartoonists Stephen Hillenburg and Roy Gonzalez, plus the creative outputs of Josh Martin, Denis Stock, and Nate Lawrence add additional facets and textures.

Features
Photo by Ron Stoner

Strangely, Stoner’s—the spot that became a sort of avatar for tropical perfection in the 60s—now finds itself a forgotten backwater with relatively little surf visitation.

Page 22

AKA Stoner’s

How the original secret spot was overshadowed by time and inclination.

Photo by Shawn Parkin

Page 38

Chain of Custody

Informed by the work of journeymen and pioneers, Josh Martin’s workshop is part skunkworks, part cabinet of curiosities.

Photo by Dennis Stock/Magnum Photos

Page 46

Something About California Bugged Dennis Stock

When a Magnum agency legend turned his lens on our culture.

Photo by Pablo Jiménez

We climbed along the edges of, and then under and into, creaking and melting glaciers. We dodged open ocean storms coming up from the Artic. We were attacked by blood sucking bugs whenever we left our tents. We also found waves.

Page 58

The Andes & the Ice Field

Hunting for surf on the Isthmus of Ofqui.

Roy Gonzales

Page 66

Monsters Ink

Retracing the artistic journey of Roy Gonzalez.

Photo by Damea Dorsey

“I’m still more or less doing the same thing—exploring for waves and finding them. It never gets old—coming around the corner and seeing a perfect lineup.”

Page 74

Captain Daly’s Redoubt

Highly decorated surf explorer Martin Daly has just finished polishing the gelcoat on his Marshall Islands lodge. As far-flung tropical idylls go, it doesn’t look half bad…

Stephen Hillenburg

Page 86

The Billion-Dollar Sketchbook

How animator and surfer Stephen Hillenburg’s brainchild made its debut around a Baja campfire.

Page 96

Portfolio: Nate Lawrence

Indonesian cul-de-sacs, Californian heritages, and the inarguable benefits of showing up.

Back Issue

27.6

On the cover: Human corona—Mikey Wright at Off The Wall. Features inside the book shed light on a rivermouth sandbank in equatorial Africa, the swamps and inlets of Florida, and a foundational headland on the East Coast of Australia. The pitfalls of modern surf forecasting, the mind-space of a slab-hunting fireman, and the irreverent outputs of artist Paul McNeil mark other points of conference.

Back Issue

27.6

On the cover: Human corona—Mikey Wright at Off The Wall. Features inside the book shed light on a rivermouth sandbank in equatorial Africa, the swamps and inlets of Florida, and a foundational headland on the East Coast of Australia. The pitfalls of modern surf forecasting, the mind-space of a slab-hunting fireman, and the irreverent outputs of artist Paul McNeil mark other points of conference.

Features
Photo By Russell Ord

Page 22

Jughead

Thrust into the international spotlight, an Aussie fireman epitomizes the required mindset of a true slab hunter.

Photo By Alan Van Gysen

A large, older soldier does all the heavy talking and plays the bad cop, while a short, quiet young man plays the good cop. “Terrorist, terrorist!” the big one shouts, pointing at me.

Page 34

To the Bight of Biafra

Between the city and the jungle in Equatorial Guinea.

Photo By Sean Kelly Conway

Page 40

Not Up to Code

Walter Coker’s serpentine life in surfing and journalism.

Photos By Rob Gilley

Page 50

Noble Rot

Orphaned slides reveal the surprises of photographic ripening.

Photo by Al Mackinnon

The road runs arrow-straight through the Gondwanan Rainforest, flanked by cabbage-tree palms and swamp oaks. These days, you can drive right up to Angourie Point. The area feels like a sentinel island, a last outpost of human settlement.

Page 60

Angourie in Their Hearts

An original Australian escape hatch finds itself challenged by modernity—but not yet overmatched.

Photo Courtesy of NOAA

Page 82

From Hope to Hype

Present-day surf forecasting has replaced dark-age conjecture with pinpoint science and technology. But has it made surfing better?

Art by Paul McNeil

Page 88

Earnest Irreverence

With a keen sense of irony, artist Paul McNeil has spent his life cultivating affinity.

Photo by Laserwolf

Page 96

Portfolio: Group Show

A-grade selects from sixteen of today’s best shooters.

 

Back Issue

27.5

On the Cover: Greg Long in the far Eastern Atlantic, perhaps contemplating the benefits of length over height. The noted XXL-hunter journeyed toward African waters for the sole purpose of burning rubber down this quarter-mile, sand-bottomed drag strip. Check out the guts of the issue to read more from this trip. Various other points and personas also included within.

Back Issue

27.5

On the Cover: Greg Long in the far Eastern Atlantic, perhaps contemplating the benefits of length over height. The noted XXL-hunter journeyed toward African waters for the sole purpose of burning rubber down this quarter-mile, sand-bottomed drag strip. Check out the guts of the issue to read more from this trip. Various other points and personas also included within.

Features
PHOTO BY FRED POMPERMAYER

At their best, and in the hands of a cliché-avoiding pilot, camera drones can peel back the skin on a surf spot. Trimmed of the incessant electric buzz, one can take in the vistas peacefully—mind surfing to a pleasant numbness.

Page 22

Indronesia

The Mentawai Archipelago from above.

PHOTO BY BRIAN BIELMANN

Page 36

Into the Forge with Ryan Thomas

The naturalistic captures of a filmmaker’s lens.

IMAGES COURTESY OF JOSEPH TABLER BOOKS

Page 48

Brine Trust

Scenes from surfing’s 70s counterculture.

PHOTO BY SARAH LEE

Page 54

Hard Science/Native Son

From the lab to the pit with Clifford Kapono.

PHOTO BY Al Mackinnon

Sunrise revealed infinite dunes emanating from the Saharan dawn. As we approached the shore, we saw rooster tails, a hint of the sub-sea-level tubes careening down the point. We followed one particularly filthy specimen with our eyes as it ground across the bar.

Page 66

Saharan Echoes

Cracking the code in the Eastern Atlantic.

PHOTO BY GREG EWING

Page 84

The Power We Get From the Sea

Avo Ndamase’s commitment.

PHOTO COURTESY OF PARRASCH HEIJNEN GALLERY

Page 90

Resin, Light, and Space

The solidified artwork of Peter Alexander.

PHOTO BY SETH DE ROULET

Photographing the late 1990s NYC skate scene gave him a comfort level with close quarters, unpredictable action, and risk. When you consider some of his tight-angled images, which convey an urgent and intimate sort of energy, it becomes hard to argue with this approach.

Page 98

Portfolio: Seth de Roulet

The westward tilt.

Back Issue

27.4

On the cover: Reno Abellira, Dick Brewer, Gerry Lopez, April 1969, Oahu. “We were fueled up with some good smoke and great company,” says photographer David Darling. “When Reno spotted the Makiki water-pump station, we off-loaded our boards and burned through some yoga poses. Next, we stopped in the woods, climbed some trees, and laid out the boards in the groundcover.” Inside the book, features scan from Indonesian shamans, to Art Brewer’s imagery of the quick and the dead, to the barren surrealism of the South Australian surfscape. More below.

Back Issue

27.4

On the cover: Reno Abellira, Dick Brewer, Gerry Lopez, April 1969, Oahu. “We were fueled up with some good smoke and great company,” says photographer David Darling. “When Reno spotted the Makiki water-pump station, we off-loaded our boards and burned through some yoga poses. Next, we stopped in the woods, climbed some trees, and laid out the boards in the groundcover.” Inside the book, features scan from Indonesian shamans, to Art Brewer’s imagery of the quick and the dead, to the barren surrealism of the South Australian surfscape. More below.

Features
Photo by Al Mackinnon

“I’ve never been a winner. That’s not my thing. When I’m sitting on the inside bowl, and I get a huge set on the head, I expect it to happen. I enjoy that part of it too. I’m used to it not coming easy.”

Page 22

Clare in His Blood

Tom Lowe on the big wave stage.

Photo by Jeremiah Klein

Page 32

Electric Blue Maybes

Risks and rewards on the Westside of Oahu.

Illustration by Armando Veve

Page 40

Fiction: Lucky You Surf

Greer surfed, and occasionally shot craps. He’d never been to Hawaii, but that didn’t mean he wasn’t lucky.

Photo by Art Brewer

Page 48

Offerings

Art Brewer’s altar of rarities.

Photo by Todd Glaser

At one point, after his father’s wake, one of the local groms proposed that a surfer of Dave’s ability could ride anything, even a coffin.

Page 68

Good Trouble

The continuing education of Dave Rastovich.

Photo by Heather Hiller

At midday, Lepon and I walked along a new gash that severed his tiny hamlet, the first road ever to connect the village to the outside world. The mud from the half-constructed motorway had the appearance of a bloody coagulation—oozing, sticky, and warm.

Page 80

The Sikerei of the Islands

Tattoos and reef waves, shamans and cultural collisions in the Mentawai.

Photo by SA RIPS

Page 98

Portfolio: SA Rips

West of Pointerville, through the lens of a South Australian shooter.

 

Back Issue

27.3

On the cover: Matahi Drollet navigates the hydro prism at Teahupoo. Pinpoints inside the mag drift from the frozen river mouths of Iceland to a sultry pier in India. White sharks in Gansbaai, the oldest continuously inhabited structure in California, and the lifecycle of surfing as a competitive endeavor are each held to the light for further revelations. More below.

Back Issue

27.3

On the cover: Matahi Drollet navigates the hydro prism at Teahupoo. Pinpoints inside the mag drift from the frozen river mouths of Iceland to a sultry pier in India. White sharks in Gansbaai, the oldest continuously inhabited structure in California, and the lifecycle of surfing as a competitive endeavor are each held to the light for further revelations. More below.

Features
Photo by Chris Burkard

Waves explode over the pier, cracking it and breaking off pieces of concrete. Swells like these are usually impossible to score, because big surf can shutdown the ferry to the island for weeks.

Page 22

The Coral Crown of India

Locals and blow-ins alike revel in the Lakshadweep islands.

Photo By Dylan Gordon

Page 36

A Hippie in our Midst

Guided by communal beginnings and bodily sensation, Alrik Yuill sculpts surfboards and shapes sculptures.

Illustrations By Nishant Choksi

Page 46

Mixed Results

Modern professional surfing’s spotty track record from the IPS to the WSL.

Photo By C.R. Stecyk

Page 52

House of Sand and Mud

The oldest inhabited structure in California—and its still-thriving surf connections.

Photo By Anthony Fox

“I simply wanted to get to the reef as fast as possible while making the least amount of disturbance along the way. I was convinced I was still alive only because the sharks had yet to spot me.”

Page 62

No Man’s Land

Into the predation cycle in Gansbaai.

Photo By Julie Licari

Page 70

The Schooled Chaos of Jazz

Professional jazz guitarist Peter Sprague finds the harmony between surf and music.

Photo By Elli Thor Magnusson

Page 78

Portfolio: Elli Thor Magnusson

Snowstorms, volcanic backdrops, and arctic surf-hunting through an Icelandic lens.

Artworks by Ron Croci

Page 98

Masters of the Kaiser’s Bowl

Portraits from a South Shore landmark.

Photo By Mike Moir

“My attitude as a kid was kind of crazy suicidal, but that craziness got me fame. It medicated me. All those things started coming out of me later, as a man.”

Page 98

The Confirmation of Danny Kwock

An industry tycoon faces the doldrums of anticlimax.

Back Issue

27.2

On the cover: Arthur “Toots” Anchinges summons the spirits of Rabbit, Ah Choy, and Bird's Nest at Queen's Surf, Waikiki. Features inside the book commune with punk rockers and mutated golems, ex-pats in the Atacama Desert and beastly surf in the Eastern Atlantic. Underwater imagery from Everton Luis and the modernist subjects of John Respondek bookend the experience. More below.

Back Issue

27.2

On the cover: Arthur “Toots” Anchinges summons the spirits of Rabbit, Ah Choy, and Bird's Nest at Queen's Surf, Waikiki. Features inside the book commune with punk rockers and mutated golems, ex-pats in the Atacama Desert and beastly surf in the Eastern Atlantic. Underwater imagery from Everton Luis and the modernist subjects of John Respondek bookend the experience. More below.

Features
Photo by Everton Luis

“Across the channel, the tide was draining off the Rags Right reef like God had pulled the plug. Everton suggested they go for it—but only if each member of the crew selected a distinct craft.”

Page 24

Cutting Edges

With a single-fin, a twin-fin, and a thruster divided between them, Alex Knost, Craig Anderson, and Ozzie Wright engage in the great cosmic Mentawai experiment.

Photo by Geoffrey Ragatz

Page 30

Gringo X

An anonymous ex-pat on Chile's Atacama coast.

Illustrations by Bruce Carlton, Photo by Roberta Bayley

Page 38

Rocket to Rockaway

Art-house/grindhouse media experimentations with The Ramones and “Mutant Monster Beach Party.”

Photo by Al Mackinnon

“The windowpanes were rattling with each detonation. I touched the curtains, the door. They shivered with the thunder of each lip.”

Page 52

The Colossus in the Garden

Beatings and victory in maximum point surf in the Eastern Atlantic.

Photo by Christopher Bickford

Page 64

Legends of the Sandbar

A monochrome paean to the Outer Banks.

Photo by Swilly

Page 78

Soundings: Acute Angles

Discussing twin-fins in the modern context with M.R., Spider Murphy, and other master craftsman.

Photo by Leo Hetzel

Page 90

David Nuuhiwa By Leo Hetzel

“When David arrived, everything changed. He was graceful. Ballet on a board. He was the best guy in the water.”

Photo by John Respondek

Page 96

Portfolio: John Respondek

The Australian photographer works hard, plays harder, and just might be the most delighted person in the world…except when someone sets up next to him.

Back Issue

27.1

On the cover: Pulse advent. “Ocean swells travel separate paths for thousands of miles,” says photographer Trent Mitchell. “I’m interested in the displays of chaos and synergy at this point of union.” Features inside the flap rove from an urban surf-scape in the Middle East to an examination of artificial waves—and their existential impacts. A Hawaiian bodysurf Mecca, an archipelago in the South Pacific, two visual/spatial artists, and a horde of full-bleed surf imagery offer waypoints of interest.

Back Issue

27.1

On the cover: Pulse advent. “Ocean swells travel separate paths for thousands of miles,” says photographer Trent Mitchell. “I’m interested in the displays of chaos and synergy at this point of union.” Features inside the flap rove from an urban surf-scape in the Middle East to an examination of artificial waves—and their existential impacts. A Hawaiian bodysurf Mecca, an archipelago in the South Pacific, two visual/spatial artists, and a horde of full-bleed surf imagery offer waypoints of interest.

Features
Photo by Ben Thouard

Page 22

The Distant Islands

A foray into the sprawling Tuamotu Archipelago, roughly 80 specs of land spread across a patch of water the size of Western Europe.

Photo by Shawn Parkin

Page 32

Reinvention X Restoration

At home with designer, creative, and Laguna Beach enfant-terrible turned-real-estate imaginative Steve Jones.

Photo by Todd Glaser/Kelly Slater Wave Co.

Page 42

Pleasure Units

The latest wave pools might define the border between surfing as we know it and its transformation into something…other.

Photo by JJ Wessels

Page 52

Rumblin’

Painter. Board Builder. Wrench. Brian Bent is more than the sum of his parts.

Photo by John Respondek

Page 64

Next Year, Tel Aviv!

Surprisingly wave-rich, Israel’s second-largest city is a modern coastal hub for metropolitans, some surfers, and the descendants of the dispersed.

Photo by Keoki Saguibo

Page 76

The Panic Response

Hawaiian bodysurfing’s place of refuge, and the Oahu locals bent on preserving it.

Images Courtesy of Mary Ryan Collection

Page 88

Better Surfing Through Chemistry

The rise, fall, and resonance of the 1960s wax-works, Surf Research.

Photo by Woody Gooch

Page 96

Portfolio: Group Show

Bull kelp, roadside oddities, and consummate surf imagery from the field.

Back Issue

26.6

On the cover: Having broken his favored shooter, Santa Cruz surfer Wilem Banks runs the diagnostics on an even lower-tide Scottish session on a borrowed board. Inside the book, further odysseys follow a team of daredevils to the glacial outfalls of Alaska, a crew of Indonesian boat-in pioneers through the revelation of Desert Point, and director Bruce Brown’s still-camera inside the most impactful surf movie ever assembled. Technical analysis of the asymmetrical surfboard, and a deep batch of imagery from the frontlines of the professional surf arena, add motion and ballast.

Back Issue

26.6

On the cover: Having broken his favored shooter, Santa Cruz surfer Wilem Banks runs the diagnostics on an even lower-tide Scottish session on a borrowed board. Inside the book, further odysseys follow a team of daredevils to the glacial outfalls of Alaska, a crew of Indonesian boat-in pioneers through the revelation of Desert Point, and director Bruce Brown’s still-camera inside the most impactful surf movie ever assembled. Technical analysis of the asymmetrical surfboard, and a deep batch of imagery from the frontlines of the professional surf arena, add motion and ballast.

Features
Photo by Bo Bridges

“The glacier is an ice city on a conveyor belt to its destruction. In time, each building advances upon the water and implodes in spectacular fashion. Sometimes city blocks, sometimes several of them, meet their catastrophic end at once. When this happens, somewhere below, a rare and ghostly wave is formed.”

Page 22

THE CALVES OF COPPER RIVER

It’s been nearly a decade since Garrett McNamara and company went to Alaska and attempted the most audacious novelty project in surfdom.

Photo by Todd Glaser/A-Frame

Page 34

IN UNEQUAL MEASURE

Tricking the eye with their apparently nature-defying curvature, the asymmetrical surfboard comes down to the pursuit of ultimate balance.

Photo by Woody Gooch

“The Sri Wira Bakti was a 36-foot motorsailer, a standard Indonesian-style workboat—diesel motor, a big hold down below with a roofed galley on the stern. We were sleeping in the same room with the engine with no muffler. And the Balinese crew was also pretty feral. They’d be chopping vegetables on the deck and cooking over an open flame near the fuel cans.”

Page 48

FAVORS OF FORTUNE

Across the Straight to Desert Point.

Photo Courtesy of Bruce Brown Films, LLC

Page 68

BRUCE’S BEAUTIES

Timed to the advent of the 50th anniversary of The Endless Summer, a hidden archive of production stills and photos taken by the director.

Photo by Ryan Miller

Page 78

PORTFOLIO

Technique, craft, and sweat-equity on the WSL trail with the radiant and robust Ryan Miller.

Photo by Steve Wilkings

Page 98

A LEGEND AND A MENACE

Bouncing with the first big-wave bodyboarder, Phyllis “Jill” Dameron Albrecht.

Photo by Al Mackinnon

Page 104

TRUST THE PROCESS

Slab hunting—deep off the grid—along the flagstone reefs of Scotland.

Back Issue

26.5

On the cover: Tyler Thornsley, traversing the thin line between disaster and delight at Wedge. Features inside the book chart the mirrored perfection of twin African points, dissect the foundational surfing of Oxnard’s Russ Short, and enjoin a string of clip hunts across Iceland, Mexico, and the Maldives with the likes of Steph Gilmore and Ryan Burch. Digital disruptions on the Victorian Coast of Oz, high-resolution slide film on Oahu’s North Shore, and the “death of print” in the surf media are variously discussed.

Back Issue

26.5

On the cover: Tyler Thornsley, traversing the thin line between disaster and delight at Wedge. Features inside the book chart the mirrored perfection of twin African points, dissect the foundational surfing of Oxnard’s Russ Short, and enjoin a string of clip hunts across Iceland, Mexico, and the Maldives with the likes of Steph Gilmore and Ryan Burch. Digital disruptions on the Victorian Coast of Oz, high-resolution slide film on Oahu’s North Shore, and the “death of print” in the surf media are variously discussed.

Features
Photo by Craig Fineman

“Short was a member of a band of outsiders. He soon shone as the brightest, the most talented, and the most soulful adept in the Bonzer cult. Nevertheless, he somehow seemed to slip through the pages, into obscurity.”

Page 22

THE INFLUENCER

In the 1970s, Oxnard’s Russ Short laid the roots for a new era of California style and performance. Then he was lost to history.

Photo by Andreas Jaritz

Page 34

COASTAL SURVEY

Voices and faces from the surf frontiers of Africa, from Morocco to Senegal.

Art by Mike Salisbury

Page 48

“LET’S DO IT!”

The life and death of Surfing magazine.

Photo by Chris Gentile

Page 58

GET CLIP

Stacking footage in Iceland, Mexico, and the Maldives with Ryan Burch, Creed McTaggart, Steph Gilmore, and the rest of the cast of Self-Discovery for Social Survival.

Photo by Philip Mauro

Page 66

SEA MEMORY

Fine artist Mary Heilmann.

Photo by Alan Van Gysen

Page 74

THE AFRICAN COINFLIP

Mirroring points in Namibia and Mozambique lure African surfers. Heads you bake, tails you freeze.

Photo by Lance Trout

Page 84

CALL ME AT THE CRACK OF NOON

North Shore photographer Shirley Rogers stands alone.

Photo by Ed Sloane

“I think about digital disruption all the time. I started shooting in 2009 so this is all I know. You get exposed to so many disposable images on social media. But there will always be a home for classic images.”

Page 98

PORTFOLIO: ED SLOANE

A young shooter from Australia’s Victorian Coast in the time of Instagram

Back Issue

26.4

On the cover: “Water is the New Black,” 18x24-inch screen print by Shepard Fairey. Renderings inside the book frame the combat and surf photography of photojournalist Nic Bothma, sketch in the dimensions of Skip Frye’s personal quiver, and go horseback on an expedition through the wilds of Chile. Long reads by Kimball Taylor (on the current state of bodyboarding) and Jamie Brisick (with a haunting essay on love, death, and Brazilian shore-pound) add depth and shading.

Back Issue

26.4

On the cover: “Water is the New Black,” 18x24-inch screen print by Shepard Fairey. Renderings inside the book frame the combat and surf photography of photojournalist Nic Bothma, sketch in the dimensions of Skip Frye’s personal quiver, and go horseback on an expedition through the wilds of Chile. Long reads by Kimball Taylor (on the current state of bodyboarding) and Jamie Brisick (with a haunting essay on love, death, and Brazilian shore-pound) add depth and shading.

Features
Photo by Brian Nevins

“This is boat-required surfing. I won’t say exactly how far offshore we are, but it’s out of sight of land. If something bad happened, the Coast Guard might get to you in time. Or they might not.”

PAGE 22

The Down East Skiff Trip

A New England seamount discovery.

Photo by Matty Hannon

“We knew nothing about horses, couldn’t even mount them properly. There was so much to learn, beginning with how to prevent them from snapping ropes, destroying pack rigging, and galloping for the hills whenever we brought a surfboard anywhere near them.”

PAGE 32

Pack and Saddle

Down the Chilean coast a la jinete.

Photo by Leroy Bellet

PAGE 42

The Big Boogie

Despite their labeling as “pests” and “lessers,” bodyboarders continue to charge, innovate, and pack barrels, often in obscurity.

Photo by Peter Green

PAGE 56

Expat Days

When photographer Peter Green left California for Australia in 1972, he wasn’t fleeing anything. He just never came back.

Photo by Nic Bothma

PAGE 66

War and Waves

Deep into the cave with combat and surf photojournalist Nic Bothma.

Photo by Shawn Parkin

PAGE 76

The Caretaker of Intangible Ingredients

The personal quiver of San Diego’s Harry “Skip” Frye.

Photo by John Florence

“I’m bodysurfing the north end of Barra da Tijuca, a spot called Praia do Pepê. I am not thinking about death explicitly, but death hangs over all of this.”

PAGE 92

The Dazzling Blackness

Life and loss, viewed through the lens of thumping shorebreak.

Photo by Sacha Specker

PAGE 100

Portfolio: Play the Hits

Recent photography from TSJ’s working archive.

Back Issue

26.3

On the cover: Dino Adrian, helicopter angle, Injidup, Western Australia. Planes of focus inside the book alight on the multi-disciplined surfing of Justin Quintal, reveal Michael Halsband’s NYC photo studio, and unearth a trove of 60s era North Shore imagery from Val Valentine. Supporting action provided by the likes of Dane Reynolds, Craig Anderson, and Dion Agius in South Oz, plus the Millennial subject matter of lensman Duncan Macfarlane.

Back Issue

26.3

On the cover: Dino Adrian, helicopter angle, Injidup, Western Australia. Planes of focus inside the book alight on the multi-disciplined surfing of Justin Quintal, reveal Michael Halsband’s NYC photo studio, and unearth a trove of 60s era North Shore imagery from Val Valentine. Supporting action provided by the likes of Dane Reynolds, Craig Anderson, and Dion Agius in South Oz, plus the Millennial subject matter of lensman Duncan Macfarlane.

Features
Photo by Jeff Divine

PAGE 22

DREAM ON

The strobing, hallucinatory visuals of 70s-era artist Glenn Chase.

Photo by Dave Nelson

“Of course this is heresy to the surf industry, which has historically revered the ‘core’ among all else, and which has its origin story rooted deeply in surfers making products for surfers by surfers.”

PAGE 30

RIDERS OF THE ’STORM

Behold: the mass produced, Costco-bought Wavestorm, the best-selling surfboard in the world.

Photo by Kenny Hurtado

PAGE 38

BUILDERS OF THE NORTH

Pine trees, wood hewn vehicles, and cobblestone reefs in British Columbia with Jay Nelson, Derrick Disney, and Danny Hess.

Photo by Elli Thor Magnusson

“He practiced drop knees and nose riding on prog logs. This was a time when anything over six foot was frowned upon, unless it carried an old-timer. Yet it was clear he had a natural talent for that kind of surfing—for the balletic, paced approach longboarding demanded.”

PAGE 50

NORMCORE

Equipment polymath Justin Quintal and his multifaceted wave-sliding.

Photo Courtesy of Val Valentine Collection Trust

PAGE 60

A FRIEND OF A FRIEND

Wrestling commentator, photographer, and Sunset Beach denizen Val Valentine was a fixture among the 1960s North Shore community.

Photo by John Respondek

“Three of the most high-profile surfers in the world, with access to everything performance-earned money and fame can buy. All the more reason to drop the trappings, get scared, and sleep in the dirt.”

PAGE 70

SUPER CREW

Dane Reynolds, Craig Anderson, and Dion Agius duck out of modernity and into an unnamed slab in the Outback.

Photo by Gabriel Thompson

PAGE 78

NORTH OF MADISON

At home with Hasselblad master Michael Halsband.

Photo by Seth Stafford

“My movements were governed by how the trade winds interacted with the coastline. The east: raw, mountainous, onshore. The west: developed, sheltered, offshore. There were exceptions, like the calmness of the twilight hour, or bends in the wind direction that favored certain angles.”

PAGE 88

THE PLURAL ISLAND

One Barbados, various coasts, reefs, peoples, and pockets.

Photo by Duncan Macfarlane

PAGE 98

THE MILLENNIAL SHOOTER

On assignment or self-directed, the results of Duncan Macfarlane’s work yield images that are mind-surf worthy.

Back Issue

26.2

On the cover: From a deep surfing family to just…deep, Mikala Jones self-documents the inner recesses of an Indonesian cavern. Additional explorations in the book trace performance surfing into the prehistoric era, investigate the fast life and sudden death of New York surfer/hustler Rick Rasmussen, and range from the Chocolate Islands of São Tomé to the glacial estuaries of Iceland.

Back Issue

26.2

On the cover: From a deep surfing family to just…deep, Mikala Jones self-documents the inner recesses of an Indonesian cavern. Additional explorations in the book trace performance surfing into the prehistoric era, investigate the fast life and sudden death of New York surfer/hustler Rick Rasmussen, and range from the Chocolate Islands of São Tomé to the glacial estuaries of Iceland.

Features
Photo by Brent Bielmann/A-Frame

Who can say when riding sideways on an unbroken wave face began? Even on shorter bellyboard-style surfboards, used at the base of the Polynesian Triangle, it seems unlikely that surfers wouldn’t have flirted with going lala.

PAGE 22

GOING LALA

Did some Hawaiian gremmie stomp-stall his alaia in say, 800 A.D. at a river mouth suck-bank? The dawn of performance surfing may be older than you think.

Photo by Chris Burkard

PAGE 34

GLACIAL RELATIONSHIPS

High above the Iceland’s longest river, photographer Chris Burkard tracks sandbar waves to their glacial headwaters.

Photo by Jeff Divine

PAGE 46

SOUNDINGS: ROCKER

Six shapers. One design element. Parsing the most elusive characteristic of surfboard design.

Photo by D.J. Struntz

PAGE 58

THE LOVER’S GUIDE TO SURF CINEMA

Joe Guglielmino (most commonly referred to as Joe G., or Joseph G., but never just Joe) is a surf filmmaker who occupies a very central position in surf film’s Valhalla.

Photo by Greg Ewing

“We had heard about São Tomé’s surf scene and expected to find these local surfers. We had not expected to find them busting airs.”

PAGE 66

THE CHOCOLATE ISLANDS

Located 200 miles from the mainland in the Gulf of Guinea, São Tomé has a homegrown wave-riding culture fostered by its locals, both past and present.

Photo by Jeff Divine

PAGE 76

UNSAFE AT ANY SPEED

New York surf legend Rick Rasmussen was one of the best surfers of his generation. A U.S. Champion by the age of 19, he was dead by 27, shot in a drug deal gone wrong in Harlem.

Art by Jonathan Zawada

PAGE 92

GALLERY

The distortionist design work of Jonathan Zawada.

Photo by Al Mackinnon

“I can’t say much except to mention that I’ve done several trips to this location and, on most occasions, my friends and I were the only surfers in the area.”

PAGE 98

PORTFOLIO: WARMING IN THE HORSEBOX

Surveying the files of British-Isles-based photographer Al Mackinnon.